RODRIGO ROA DUTERTE
PRESIDENT

MINDA CALAGUIAN-CRUZ
AMBASSADOR

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  • Second FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICER (FSO) QUALIFYING TEST FOR 2013

    Foreign Service Exam imageThe Board of Foreign Service Examinations, pursuant to the provisions of the Foreign Service Act (R.A. 7157) of 1991 and the Revised Administrative Code of 1987, announces the holding of a Second FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICER (FSO) EXAMINATIONS in 2013 to recruit candidates for appointment to the position of Foreign Service Officer, Class IV.

    Please click here for more info.

  • DISPLAY OF FILIPINO TRADITIONAL DRESS AT THE INSPIRATION HUB, FLORIADE 2013 Commonwealth Park, Canberra

    The Embassy is inviting all kababayans and friends to visit the Philippine display at the Inspiration Hub during  their Floriade tours.

    In celebration of Floriade, Australia’s biggest spring celebration and in celebration of Canberra’s centenary, five (5) Filipino traditional dress are on display at the Inspiration Hub from 07 to 13 October 2013.

    The traditional Filipino wear featured are Baro’t Saya, Terno, Maria Clara, Barong Tagalog and Iamma and Gamit (Indigenous garment from Central Cordillera of Northern Luzon).

    There are write-ups on the materials and fabrics used in the costumes and a brief description on their evolution through Philippine history, including the people and regions in the Philippines where these are normally worn and for which occasions.

  • ASEAN Family in Canberra Unites for a Day of Fun

    Chargé d’Affaires Mary Anne A. Padua led Philippine Embassy personnel during the ASEAN Family Day held on 16 October 2010 at the Sala Thai of the Embassy of the Kingdom of Thailand. 

    Spearheaded by the High Commission of Singapore, which currently chairs the ASEAN Canberra Committee, the ASEAN Family Day gathered together the members of the ASEAN Missions in Canberra and their families in a day of fun and games. 

    Mixed teams of ten members each competed in games such as Egg Race, Puzzle Making, Kerupuk Eating Challenge, Pass the Message and Sack Race.  

    For lunch, the Missions’ personnel and their families sampled sumptuous native dishes prepared by the different ASEAN Missions.

     

    The Blue Team

    The Blue Team, the over-all winner during the ASEAN Family Day 2010, competes in the Kerupuk (Bahasa for “cracker”) Eating Challenge.

  • Philippine Advisory No.5 - Tax and Tariff Exemptions on Relief Goods for Typhoon Ondoy Victims

    As advised by the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) in Manila, the Philippine Embassy wishes to inform all Filipino organizations and other concerned individuals in Australia that President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo has issued Executive Order No. 831. Please view it here.

     

  • Philippine Advisory No.4 - Additional Accounts for Assistance to Victims of Typhoon Ondoy

    The Department of Foreign Affairs in Manila has advised the Philippine Embassy that the Office of the President (OP), in partnership with Caritas, has put up the "Sagip Tulong Program" designed to assist as a quick response to assist the victims of Typhoon Ondoy.

  • Maraming Salamat!

    We wish to thank friends from the Filipino-Australian community, as well as concerned individuals, for joining us in Sunday Mass at St. Cristopher's Cathedral in Manuka on 04 October 2009, despite the short notice given by the Philippine Embassy. In the midst of the financial and material efforts being made for the victims of Typhoon Ondoy (Typhoon Ketsana) last week, someone rightfully asked: "What about our collective offering of prayer?"

  • Philippine Embassy Advisory No.3: Assistance for Typhoon Ondoy Victims

    Further to the advisories issued by the Philippine Embassy on 29 September and 02 October 2009, kindly note the following additional information/updates, please view it here.

  • Philippine Embassy Advisory - Additional Information - Assistance for Typhoon Ondoy Victims

    In addition to transmitting cash donations directly to the bank accounts of the National Disaster Coordinating Center (NDCC), Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and the Philippine National Red Cross, as announced in the Philippine Embassy Advisory of 29 September 2009, Filipino community organizations and other concerned individuals may wish to avail of the facilities being offered by the Filipino businesses/organizations, you can view it here.

  • Mobile Passport Services in Melbourne

    The Philippine Honorary Consulate General in Melbourne has organized a mobile passport service to coincide with the “Fiesta sa Melbourne”.

    The Embassy’s mobile passport team will be at the “Fiesta sa Melbourne” to accept applications for Machine Readable Passport at the following time and location:

    29 November 2008                           10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
    30 November 2008                           11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

    Location: Philippine Fiesta Grounds
    Corner Thomas and Armstrong Streets
    Laverton, Victoria

  • COMELEC EXTENDS PERIOD FOR FILING OF APPLICATIONS FOR REACTIVATION FOR OVERSEAS VOTERS WHOSE RECORDS WERE DEACTIVATED

    The Philippine Embassy is pleased to inform the public that Commission on Elections (COMELEC) Resolution No. 10005 promulgated on 15 October 2015 extends the filing of applications for reactivation of voter registration from 31 October 2015 to    9 December 2015.

  • MOBILE EPASSPORT MISSIONS FOR 2016

    MOBILE EPASSPORT MISSIONS FOR 2016

    The Philippine Embassy is pleased to announce the schedule for Mobile Consular Missions for 2016.

    During the mobile missions, the Embassy will field personnel who will attend to the biometrics capture of Philippine ePassport applicants and administer the oath of allegiance to petitioners for dual citizenship.

    To ensure the orderly conduct of the Missions, ePassport applicants should pre-register and secure an appointment/slot with the Embassy within the dates indicated in the 4th column in the schedule below.

    Due to limited data capture equipment, walk-in applicants cannot be accommodated.

    The 2016 schedule and details for the mobile missions to the various Australian state/territory capitals follow:

    DATE AND TIME

    CITY

    VENUE

    DATES EMBASSY WILL RECEIVE MAILED EPASSPORT APPLICATIONS

    Passport Service:

    Tuesday to Friday, 13- 16 September 2016, 8AM – 5 PM

    Oath taking for dual citizens:

    Tuesday and Wednesday,

    13 and 14 Sept 2016 at 3:00 PM on both days

    Brisbane

    Chermside Kedron Uniting Church

    590 Gympie Road, Chermside

    20 June 2016 to

    23 August 2016

    HOW TO PRE-REGISTER/SECURE AN APPOINTMENT

    To pre-register/secure an appointment, an applicant should mail the following to the Philippine Embassy, 1 Moonah Place, Yarralumla, ACT 2600:

          1.  A duly accomplished ePassport Application Form with the following supporting documents:     

           a. Photocopy of data page of current passport.

           b. Photocopy of Australian visa

    Additional Requirements:

    •              For women changing status from single to married – the original and copy of Report of Marriage or NSO-authenticated Marriage Certificate.
    •              For those applying for a new passport – the original and a copy of Report of Birth or NSO-authenticated Birth Certificate.
    •              If a dual citizen - a photocopy of the Identification Certificate, Oath of Allegiance and Order.
    •              If old passport is lost - an Affidavit of Loss, Police Report, plus same requirements as for new passport.

    It is important that applicants provide contact information (e-mail address preferred) in the Application Form so the Embassy can send an email confirming receipt and approval of the Application and informing the applicant of the date and time of his appointment.

    Please note that information on theappointment time/day will be emailed to the applicantwithin three (3) weeks afterreceipt of their passport application.  

    Applicants are advised to check their Spam folder as the Embassy’s confirmation email has sometimes ended up in the said folder.  

    If an email appointment has not been received, applicants are requested to call the Embassy to find out when their appointment is.

    Applicants are requested to confirm with the Embassy whether or not they will be able to attend their appointment so the slot can be given to someone else if they are unable to apply during the mobile mission.

    WHEN TO BE AT THE MOBILE SITE

    ePassport Applicants are advised to be at the mobile site 30 minutes prior to their appointment.

    WHAT TO BRING AT THE MOBILE SITE

    Applicants are no longer required to bring photographs since they will have their pictures taken using ePassport data capture equipment at the mobile site.

    When applicants show up for their appointment, they are to bring:

    1. their original old/current passport, and
    2. Postal Money Order for the ePassport service fee in the amount of AUD 118.00 payable to the “Philippine Embassy.”

    Families who may have several members applying for their passport may combine the total fee in one money order.

    PASSPORT RELEASE

    All passports are printed in Manila. From the time of application, it takes about 8 to 10 weeks for the Embassy to receive passports from Manila.

    Once available, the Embassy will post on its website the list of applicants whose passports are ready for release.

    To claim their ePassports by mail/post, applicants are advised to send the following to the Embassy at 1 Moonah Place, Yarralumla, ACT 2600 through registered post/express post platinum:

    1. Original old/current Passport

    2. Photocopy of Official Receipt

    The old passport will be cancelled by the Embassy and will be mailed back to the applicant, together with the new passport.

    Further queries on the Embassy’s Mobile Missions for 2015 may be addressed to the Passport Section at Tel. (02) 62732535 or 62732536 extension 231, Fax No. (02) 62733984 or Email addresses: cbrpe@philembassy.org.au or canberra.pe@dfa.gov.ph. END

  • Consular

    This page is under construction.

  • Organization

    This page is under construction.

  • Military


     

    Military branches: Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP): Army, Navy (includes Coast Guard and Marine Corps), Air Force 

    Military manpower—military age: 20 years of age (2004 est.) 

    Military manpower—availability:
     
    males age 15-49: 22,435,982 (2004 est.)

    Military manpower—fit for military service:
     
    males age 15-49: 15,780,602 (2004 est.)

    Military manpower—reaching military age annually:
     
    males: 851,009 (2004 est.)

    Military expenditures—dollar figure: $995 million (1998)

    Military expenditures—percent of GDP: 1.5% (1998)

  • Transportation

    Railways:
    total: 897 km
    narrow gauge:
    897 km 1.067-m gauge (405 km are not in operation) (2002) 

    Highways:
    total:
    201,994 km
    paved:
    42,419 km
    unpaved:
    159,575 km (2000) 

    Waterways: 3,219 km; limited to shallow-draft (less than 1.5 m) vessels

    Pipelines: gas 565 km; oil 135 km; refined products 100 km (2003) 

    Ports and harbors: Batangas, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu, Davao, Guimaras Island, Iligan, Iloilo, Jolo, Legaspi, Manila, Masao, Puerto Princesa, San Fernando, Subic Bay, Zamboanga 

    Merchant marine:
    total:
    385 ships (1,000 GRT or over) 4,524,259 GRT/6,437,171 DWT
    foreign-owned:
    Australia 2, Canada 1, Germany 2, Greece 11, Hong Kong 15, Japan 50, Malaysia 5, Netherlands 15, Norway 6, Panama 1, United Kingdom 2, United States 4
    registered in other countries:
    87 (2003 est.)
    by type:
    bulk 99, cargo 103, chemical tanker 7, combination bulk 7, container 8, liquefied gas 9, livestock carrier 10, passenger 4, passenger/cargo 10, petroleum tanker 45, refrigerated cargo 21, roll on/roll off 16, short-sea/passenger 26, specialized tanker 1, vehicle carrier 19

    Airports: 253 (2003 est.) 

    Airports—with paved runways:
    total: 82
    over 3,047 m: 4
    2,438 to 3,047 m: 6
    1,524 to 2,437 m: 26
    914 to 1,523 m: 35
    under 914 m:
    11 (2003 est.) 

    Airports—with unpaved runways:
    total: 171
    1,524 to 2,437 m: 5
    914 to 1,523 m: 68
    under 914 m:
    98 (2003 est.) 

    Heliports: 2 (2003 est.)

  • Communications

    Telephones: main lines in use: 3,310,900 (2002); mobile cellular: 15.201 million (2002)

    Telephone system: good international radiotelephone and submarine cable services; domestic and interisland service adequate
    domestic: domestic satellite system with 11 earth stations
    international: country code - 63; 9 international gateways; submarine cables to Hong Kong, Guam, Singapore, Taiwan, and Japan; satellite earth stations—3 Intelsat (1 Indian Ocean and 2 Pacific Ocean)

    Radio broadcast stations: AM 369, FM 583, shortwave 5 note: each shortwave station operates on multiple frequencies in the language of the target audience (2004)

    Radios: 9.03 million (1992 est.)

    Television broadcast stations: 225; note - 1373 CATV networks (2004)

    Televisions: 9.2 million (1998)

    Internet Country Code: .ph

    Internet Hosts : 38,440 (2002)

     Internet Users: 3.5 million (2002)

  • Economy

    Economy - overview:

    Philippine GDP grew just under 1% in 2009 but the economy weathered the 2008-09 global recession better than its regional peers due to minimal exposure to securities issued by troubled global financial institutions; lower dependence on exports; relatively resilient domestic consumption, supported by large remittances from four-to five-million overseas Filipino workers; and a growing business process outsourcing industry. Economic growth in the Philippines has averaged 4.5% per year since 2001, when President MACAPAGAL-ARROYO took office. Despite this growth, poverty worsened during the term of MACAPAGAL-ARROYO, because of a high population growth rate and inequitable distribution of income. MACAPAGAL-ARROYO averted a fiscal crisis by pushing for new revenue measures and, until recently, tightening expenditures to address the government's yawning budget deficit and to reduce high debt and debt service ratios. But the government abandoned its 2008 balanced-budget goal in order to help the economy weather the global financial and economic storm. The economy faces several long term challenges. The Philippines must maintain the reform momentum in order to catch up with regional competitors, boost trade, alleviate poverty, and improve employment opportunities and infrastructure. Inadequate tax revenues could limit the government's ability to address these issues.

    GDP (purchasing power parity):

    $324.8 billion (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 36

    $321.9 billion (2008 est.)

    $310.2 billion (2007 est.)

    note: data are in 2009 US dollars

    GDP (official exchange rate):

    $160.6 billion (2009 est.)

    GDP - real growth rate:

    0.9% (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 102

    3.8% (2008 est.)

    7.1% (2007 est.)

    GDP - per capita (PPP):

    $3,300 (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 162

    $3,400 (2008 est.)

    $3,300 (2007 est.)

    note: data are in 2009 US dollars

    GDP - composition by sector:

    agriculture: 14.9%

    industry: 29.9%

    services: 55.1% (2009 est.)

    Labor force:

    37.89 million (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 17

    Labor force - by occupation:

    agriculture: 34%

    industry: 15%

    services: 51% (2009 est.)

    Unemployment rate:

    7.5% (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 71

    7.4% (2008 est.)

    Investment (gross fixed):

    14.3% of GDP (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 138

    Budget:

    revenues: $23.56 billion

    expenditures: $29.82 billion (2009 est.)

    Public debt:

    58.7% of GDP (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 32

    56.9% of GDP (2008 est.)

    Inflation rate (consumer prices):

    3.3% (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 105

    9.3% (2008 est.)

    Central bank discount rate:

    3.5% (31 December 2009)

    country comparison to the world: 75

    6% (31 December 2008)

    Commercial bank prime lending rate:

    6.89% (31 December 2009)

    country comparison to the world: 105

    8.75% (31 December 2008)

    Stock of money:

    $24.32 billion (30 November 2009)

    country comparison to the world: 42

    $22.53 billion (31 December 2008)

    Stock of quasi money:

    $55.71 billion (30 November 2009)

    country comparison to the world: 36

    $65.85 billion (31 December 2007)

    Stock of domestic credit:

    $81.96 billion (30 November 2009)

    country comparison to the world: 46

    $77.68 billion (31 December 2008)

    Market value of publicly traded shares:

    $130.5 billion (31 December 2009)

    country comparison to the world: 42

    $85.63 billion (31 December 2008)

    $172.5 billion (31 December 2007)

    Agriculture - products:

    sugarcane, coconuts, rice, corn, bananas, cassavas, pineapples, mangoes; pork, eggs, beef; fish

    Industries:

    electronics assembly, garments, footwear, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, wood products, food processing, petroleum refining, fishing

    Industrial production growth rate:

    -2% (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 89

    Electricity - production:

    56.57 billion kWh (2007 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 45

    Electricity - consumption:

    48.96 billion kWh (2007 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 46

    Electricity - exports:

    0 kWh (2008 est.)

    Electricity - imports:

    0 kWh (2008 est.)

    Oil - production:

    25,120 bbl/day (2008)

    country comparison to the world: 72

    Oil - consumption:

    313,000 bbl/day (2008 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 38

    Oil - exports:

    36,720 bbl/day (2007 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 83

    Oil - imports:

    342,200 bbl/day (2007 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 31

    Oil - proved reserves:

    138.5 million bbl (1 January 2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 64

    Natural gas - production:

    2.94 billion cu m (2008 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 55

    Natural gas - consumption:

    2.94 billion cu m (2008 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 74

    Current account balance:

    $8.552 billion (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 25

    $3.633 billion (2008)

    Exports:

    $37.51 billion (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 56

    $48.25 billion (2008 est.)

    Exports - commodities:

    semiconductors and electronic products, transport equipment, garments, copper products, petroleum products, coconut oil, fruits

    Exports - partners:

    US 17.6%, Japan 16.2%, Netherlands 9.8%, Hong Kong 8.6%, China 7.7%, Germany 6.5%, Singapore 6.2%, South Korea 4.8% (2009 est.)

    Imports:

    $46.39 billion (2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 47

    $61.14 billion (2008)

    Imports - commodities:

    electronic products, mineral fuels, machinery and transport equipment, iron and steel, textile fabrics, grains, chemicals, plastic

    Imports - partners:

    Japan 12.5%, US 12%, China 8.8%, Singapore 8.7%, South Korea 7.9%, Taiwan 7.1%, Thailand 5.7% (2009 est.)

    Reserves of foreign exchange and gold:

    $44.24 billion (31 December 2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 35

    $37.55 billion (31 December 2008)

    Debt - external:

    $53.14 billion (30 September 2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 48

    $66.27 billion (31 December 2008 est.)

    Stock of direct foreign investment - at home:

    $22.36 billion (31 October 2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 64

    $20.36 billion (31 December 2008 est.)

    Stock of direct foreign investment - abroad:

    $6.192 billion (31 September 2009 est.)

    country comparison to the world: 56

    $5.832 billion (31 December 2008 est.)

    Exchange rates:

    Philippine pesos (PHP) per US dollar - 47.8 (2009), 44.439 (2008), 46.148 (2007), 51.246 (2006), 55.086 (2005)

     

  • History of the Philippines

    The first humans in the Philippine Islands are thought to have come from the Asian mainland some 250,000 years ago, during the Ice Age, but few remains from that time have been discovered. Afterward, other peoples migrated to the islands, among them the negroid Aetas, who probably arrived about 25,000 years ago. A Mongoloid people from Southeast Asia followed about 10,000 years later. All are thought to have reached the islands across a land bridge that no longer exists. Larger groups of people from the regions of present-day China and Vietnam arrived from about 7000 BC to 2000 BC. The largest migrations to the islands, however, probably occurred after the 3rd century BC. The latest arrivals were people from the Malay and Indonesian archipelagos and the Polynesian islands. These migrants brought iron tools and technologies that included glassmaking and weaving as well as seafaring skills.

    In the 5th century AD a new Filipino civilization had emerged from the mixture of cultures. Traders from as far away as India became frequent visitors to the islands. Competing influences from the Middle East, India, and China brought many changes in the economy and social life. Several primary industries, such as mining and metallurgy came into being. Gold and Silver, coins and pearls were utilized as media of exchange. By the 12th century, the powerful Sri Vijayan Empire had extended its reach from its Sumatran base to the Philippines. Starting in the 14th century, Islam spread through the southern parts of the archipelago and became firmly established there. Trade with merchants of the Chinese Ming dynasty is thought to have been established by the 15th century.

    On 17 March 1521, the Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan, in the service of Spain, landed on the Homonhon Islet, near Samar Island. He was later killed in Mactan Island of Cebu in a clash with native warriors led by a chieftain named Lapu-Lapu.

    The Philippines was a prize catch for Spain which, at that time, was locked in a fierce struggle for world colonization with Portugal. The archipelago was named Felipinas for Spain's King Philip II.

    After the successful expedition in 1564 of Spain's Miguel Lopez de Legazpi, an administrative center was established in 1572 in Manila. Representatives of various Roman Catholic religious orders, such as the Augustinians, Dominicans, Franciscans, and Jesuits, to convert the population. They were successful only in Luzon and the Visayas because the Moslems resisted the Spanish efforts.

    Upon the overthrow of Spanish rule in Mexico by the Mexican War of Independence in 1821, the Philippines was put under the administrative control of Madrid. When three Filipino priests were executed for nationalist activities, a group of reformists, led by Dr. Jose Rizal, formed the Propaganda Movement in 1892 that would later pave the way for the Philippine Revolution.

    Rizal was a doctor by profession as well as a man of letters. While essentially a political moderate, his writings were critical of Spanish repression and aroused the ire of the Spanish colonial authorities. He was executed on 30 December 1896 and became the martyred symbol for Filipino aspirations to independence and self-rule. Rizal's death brought the Katipunan (Tagalog for "association") movement led by Andres Bonifacio to the fore, seeking to establish independence by open revolt. Armed hostilities commenced on 26 August 1896 when the revolutionaries tore their certificates of identity (cedulas) in repudiation of Spanish rule.

    The revolution, under the leadership of Emilio Aguinaldo was initially successful.

    However, events were soon overshadowed by outbreak of the Spanish-American War on 21 April 1898. On 12 June 1898, with the Spanish retreating to the walled city of Intramuros, Aguinaldo was able to declare Philippine Independence and to establish a government with himself as President of the first republic in Asia. However, this independence was undermined by the terms of the Treaty of Paris (December 10, 1898) which governed the cessation of hostilities between Spain and the United States. In that treaty, Spain ceded the entire archipelago to the United States in return for $20 million. On 21 December 1898, the United States proclaimed the establishment of American military rule in the Philippines. Aguinaldo and the nascent Philippine republic refused to acknowledge American domination and went to war with the Americans on 04 February 1899. Filipino resistance to American rule was weakened after Aguinaldo's capture on 23 March 1901 but sporadic warfare continued up to 1905.

    The United States established a civil government in 1902. In 1935 a commonwealth government was established complete with a Constitution, with Manuel L. Quezon as the first commonwealth president. He was reelected in 1941.

    World War II broke out in 1941. Japan annexed the Philippines after a heroic battle with Filipino-American forces making a last stand in Bataan and Corregidor. With the surrender, Filipinos took to the hills and waged a guerilla war for four years. In 1945, American-led forces liberated the Philippines.

    President Quezon had died in 1944, and Vice President Sergio Osmena succeeded him as President. On 23 April 1946, Roxas was elected president, with Elpidio Quirino as vice president. On 04 July 1946, the US flag was lowered for the last time as the Philippines was finally granted independence.

    In addition to the problem of economic rehabilitation, the new state was faced with internal strife. In central Luzon the Hukbalahaps, or Huks, a Communist-led group of former guerrillas against the Japanese, organized a rebel government with its own military, civil, and administrative procedures. Demanding collectivization of farmlands and the abolition of tenant farming, the Huks became a powerful force in Luzon.

    Vice President Quirino, who became acting president on the death, in April 1948, of President Roxas, won a term on his own in 1949. The Huk rebellion continued to gather momentum in 1949 and 1950.

    In the presidential elections, held on 10 November 1953, former Defense Minister Ramon Magsaysay won a decisive victory over the incumbent Quirino, and because of his vigorous conduct of the campaign against the Huks, the back of the rebellion was broken, although it was not entirely suppressed.

    Magsaysay died in an airplane crash on 17 March 1957 and on the next day Vice President Carlos P. Garcia was sworn in as president. Garcia was subsequently elected president, and Diosdado Macapagal, an opposition Liberal party candidate, was elected vice president. Macapagal was elected president in 1961, but in the elections of 1965 he lost to the Nationalist candidate, Ferdinand Marcos.

    Rapid development of the economy brought prosperity during Marcos's first term, and he was easily reelected in 1969. His second term, however, was troubled by civil unrest, caused by increasing Communist ideological influence. By the early 1970s two separate forces, the Communist New People's Army and the Moro National Liberation Front, a Muslim separatist movement in the south, were waging guerilla war on the government. The unrest and criminal depredations were cited as excuses for the declaration of martial law in 1972. Congress was dissolved, opposition leaders arrested, and strict censorship imposed. Marcos thereafter ruled by decree.

    A new constitution was promulgated in January 1973, but transitional provisions attached to it gave Marcos continued absolute powers, and elections were indefinitely postponed. President Marcos officially ended martial law in 1981 but maintained a tight grip on the country. Opposition to his rule, however, continued to grow. In 1983, opposition leader Benigno Aquino returned to Manila from exile in the US and was assassinated by a military escort sent by Marcos to arrest him.

    The assassination dramatically increased opposition to Marcos' rule and his mandate was called into question. Marcos called for presidential elections in February 1986 with Aquino's widow, Corazon, running against him. With his attempts to cheat exposed by Church and citizen groups, Marcos lost the support of his Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile and the Armed Forces Deputy Chief of Staff General Fidel Ramos.

    The two led an uprising of military reformists who declared their allegiance to Corazon Aquino. Marcos sought to crush the uprising by sending an armored tank column against the rebels. However, more than three million Filipinos massed in the streets preventing the tanks from reaching rebel encampments. This display and a rocket attack by rebel helicopters on the presidential palace convinced Marcos to flee. He went into exile in Hawaii and later died there.

    Aquino was sworn in as President and won the enactment of a new constitution in February 1987. Although she won a vote of confidence in legislative elections that May, military unrest, coupled with popular discontent at the slow pace of economic reform, continued to threaten her government.

    In the May 1992 presidential election Aquino endorsed the eventual winner, her former defense secretary, Fidel Valdez Ramos. Ramos, a West Point graduate and a veteran of both the Korean and Vietnam Wars, assumed office with the Philippines on the verge of economic recession. Industry was crippled by a shortage of electric generating plants.

    The Administration pushed through a series of dramatic legislative measures aimed at privatizing massive infrastructure programs and further liberalizing the economy. By end of 1993, the establishment of sufficient power generating capacity, privatization efforts and the conversion of the Subic Naval Base into an industrial estate and free port ushered in a flood of foreign investment. By 1994 and 1995, the economy began exhibiting dramatic growth and looked poised to compete with those its prosperous Southeast Asian neighbors.

    The Asian financial crisis, which began in late 1997, slowed the resurgent Philippine economy. However, due to the economic reforms that had already been put in place and a democratic system that assured transparency of governance, the country was able to weather the crisis well.

    In May 1998, Joseph Ejercito Estrada was elected as President and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo was elected Vice President. The Estrada Administration placed emphasis on three major objectives: reduce poverty, preserve law and order and fight graft and corruption.

    However, in November 2000, a motion to impeach him was passed by Congress and the impeachment trial commenced presided over by Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Hilario Davide. On 16 January 2001, following a NO vote by 11 out of the 22 Senators that composed the impeachment court, a second People Power revolution was staged at EDSA demanding his resignation from office. On 20 January 2001, the Supreme Court unanimously declared the position of President vacant and Vice President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo was sworn in as President. She became the 14th President of the Philippines, the second woman to be swept into Presidency by a peaceful People Power Revolution (EDSA II).

  • Work Program

     

    Political-Security Program

    • Provides analyses, reports and policy recommendation on political and security developments in Australia, Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.
    • Maintains good working relationship with relevant parliamentary and government officials as well as private sector groups.
    • Coordinates parliamentary and ministerial/departmental visits/exchanges and promotes enhanced official linkages.
    • Monitors and reports on domestic discussions of regional and global political-security issues of interest to the Philippines, particularly in relation to the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF), Pacific Islands Forum (PIF), United Nations (UN) and other relevant international/multilateral organisations.
    • Coordinates Philippine Embassy participation in the ASEAN Committee in Canberra (ACC).

    In accordance with the Country Team Approach, the Embassy's Political Officer coordinates the Embassy's implementation of this Program with the attached agency, the Office of the Defence and Armed Forces Attache.



    Economic Diplomacy Program

    • Pursues economic diplomacy activities aimed at: (a) increasing Philippine exports to Australia; (b) expanding the volume of investments from Australia to the Philippines; (c) increasing Australian tourism flow into the Philippines; (d) promoting enhanced trade and economic relations with Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.
    • Provides timely updates and policy recommendation on economic developments, threats and opportunities vis-�-vis these countries.
    • Monitors and reports on agricultural issues and developments in Australia, including those that affect bilateral trade and cooperation in agriculture.
    • Promotes Australian Official Development Assistance (ODA), as well as monitors and provides policy recommendations on ODA implementation in the Philippines.
    • Monitors and reports on domestic discussions of regional and global economic issues of interest to the Philippines, particularly in relation to the ASEAN, APEC, WTO and other relevant international/multilateral organisations.

    In accordance with the Country Team Approach, the Embassy's Economic Officer coordinates the Embassy's implementation of this Program with the following attached agencies: the Philippine Trade and Investment Promotion Center (Trade Commissioner) in Sydney, the Office of the Philippine Tourism Representative (Tourism Attache) in Sydney and the Office of the Agricultural Attache in Canberra.



    Consular, Cultural, Women and Community Affairs Program

    • Provides efficient and courteous consular and other services to Filipino citizens in Australia, Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu, as well as to clients from these countries.
    • Promotes Philippine culture and encourages people-to-people exchanges between the Philippines and Australia, Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.
    • Participates in and supports Filipino community activities in Australia and promotes mutually beneficial activities and programs with Filipino community organisations.
    • Monitors and reports on "gender and development" (GAD) issues/concerns and promotes the status of Filipino women in Australia through the implementation of GAD activities.

    The Embassy's Consular Officer is in charge of this Program.



    Information and Image-Building Program

    • Undertakes public diplomacy and disseminates balanced information and perspective to identified audiences in order to promote the good image of the Philippines in Australia, Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.

    The Embassy's Political and Economic Officers are in charge of this Program.

  • Work Program

    Political-Security Program

    • Provides analyses, reports and policy recommendation on political and security developments in Australia, Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.
    • Maintains good working relationship with relevant parliamentary and government officials as well as private sector groups.
    • Coordinates parliamentary and ministerial/departmental visits/exchanges and promotes enhanced official linkages.
    • Monitors and reports on domestic discussions of regional and global political-security issues of interest to the Philippines, particularly in relation to the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF), Pacific Islands Forum (PIF), United Nations (UN) and other relevant international/multilateral organisations.
    • Coordinates Philippine Embassy participation in the ASEAN Committee in Canberra (ACC).

    In accordance with the Country Team Approach, the Embassy's Political Officer coordinates the Embassy's implementation of this Program with the attached agency, the Office of the Defence and Armed Forces Attache.

     

    Economic Diplomacy Program

    • Pursues economic diplomacy activities aimed at: (a) increasing Philippine exports to Australia; (b) expanding the volume of investments from Australia to the Philippines; (c) increasing Australian tourism flow into the Philippines; (d) promoting enhanced trade and economic relations with Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.
    • Provides timely updates and policy recommendation on economic developments, threats and opportunities vis-a-vis these countries.
    • Monitors and reports on agricultural issues and developments in Australia, including those that affect bilateral trade and cooperation in agriculture.
    • Promotes Australian Official Development Assistance (ODA), as well as monitors and provides policy recommendations on ODA implementation in the Philippines.
    • Monitors and reports on domestic discussions of regional and global economic issues of interest to the Philippines, particularly in relation to the ASEAN, APEC, WTO and other relevant international/multilateral organisations.

    In accordance with the Country Team Approach, the Embassy's Economic Officer coordinates the Embassy's implementation of this Program with the following attached agencies: the Philippine Trade and Investment Promotion Center (Trade Commissioner) in Sydney, the Office of the Philippine Tourism Representative (Tourism Attache) in Sydney and the Office of the Agricultural Attache in Canberra.

     

    Consular, Cultural, Women and Community Affairs Program

    • Provides efficient and courteous consular and other services to Filipino citizens in Australia, Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu, as well as to clients from these countries.
    • Promotes Philippine culture and encourages people-to-people exchanges between the Philippines and Australia, Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.
    • Participates in and supports Filipino community activities in Australia and promotes mutually beneficial activities and programs with Filipino community organisations.
    • Monitors and reports on "gender and development" (GAD) issues/concerns and promotes the status of Filipino women in Australia through the implementation of GAD activities.

    The Embassy's Consular Officer is in charge of this Program.

     

    Information and Image-Building Program

    • Undertakes public diplomacy and disseminates balanced information and perspective to identified audiences in order to promote the good image of the Philippines in Australia, Nauru, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.

    The Embassy's Political and Economic Officers are in charge of this Program.

Bids and Awards

Information Board

Commission on Filipinos Overseas

Commission on Filipinos Overseas